YCI » Overview

 

Young innovators in the culture and arts sector are providing some of the most imaginative new impulses for social improvement and sustainable development around the world today. They change the way we see and interact with each other. Young artists, creative entrepreneurs and  cultural leaders demonstrate  the  creative  vision,  talent, and  energy  that  our  societies  so  desperately  need  to  meet  the challenges of the 21st century.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) is a ten-year project launched by Salzburg Global Seminar in 2014 to engage fifty of the world's most dynamic young creative changemakers every year.

The young cultural innovators join the annual Forum in Salzburg from “YCI hubs” in six regions of the world to help them develop the dynamic vision, entrepreneurial skills, and global networks needed to advance their organizations, their causes and their communities. The YCI Forum represents a major commitment by Salzburg Global Seminar to fostering creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide with the intention of building a more vibrant and resilient arts sector and of advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide. 

Upcoming Session in 2017:

Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV
October 14 to 19, 2017

Peter Jenkinson and Shelagh Wright
in conversation about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators


 

 


How Do You Communicate the Value of Arts and Culture?
How Do You Communicate the Value of Arts and Culture?
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 

Sunday, October 27 saw the opening plenary discussions of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders. Tackling the topic of 'The Creation and the Communication of Value' were Gary Vikan, Director of the Walters Museum of Art, Deirdre Prins-Solani, an independent heritage and cultural expert in South Africa, and Patrick McIntyre, Executive Director of the Sydney Theatre Company. Below, they share their opinions on the key questions, with our Young Cultural Leaders giving their response. What can science tell us about the art experience? Gary Vikan, Director of the Walters Museum of Art on how neuroscience, evolutionary biology and the cave paintings in Lascaux might point to the fact that aesthetics is "hard-wired into our heads." How do we communicate the instrumental and intrinsic values of the arts? Vikan talks about the dangers of using economic impact as argument for the arts, the importance of articulating the intrinsic nature of the art experience and how neuroscience might unlock the mystery of that experience. What value does the arts create and how do we articulate it? Deirdre Prins-Solani, an independent heritage and cultural expert in South Africa talks about the interaction between the sacred and public spaces and how that tension creates value. What are the arguments for the arts that resonate with contemporary society? Patrick McIntyre, Executive Director of the Sydney Theatre Company on the need to talk about the arts in terms of its benefits rather than its features. What our Fellows think: The Creation and Communication of Value: Discussion Points
You can see more videos on the National Arts Strategies channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtsStrategies/, the YCI webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org/ and you can follow all the discussions in real time on our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list:  https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498
READ MORE...
You are the future!
You are the future!
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 
tanding at the front of Parker Hall and addressing 50 25-35 year olds, the president and CEO of National Arts Strategies, Russell Willis Taylor declared: “We are looking at our future. You are the future of our field!” These 50 people from 37 countries and six continents have been gathered as the inaugural in-take of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders, running from October 26 to November 1. The program has been designed in partnership between the Salzburg Global Seminar and US-based National Arts Strategies to identify and strengthen young leaders in the arts and culture sectors across the globe. Chosen from an vast field of applicants, the successful participants come a wide variety of backgrounds in the arts – from dance, music, and theater to visual media, museums, and festivals – and already have at least three years of professional experience in the cultural sector. To be selected they had to have a demonstrated interest in strengthening the position of the arts and arts institutions within societies and of having a positive impact on society, as well as showing creativity in their approach to work and openness to innovation. Through the program, co-chaired by Taylor and Mulenga Kapwepwe, chair of the National Arts Council of Zambia, these young practitioners will improve their leadership skills to enable them and their organizations to thrive in a field characterized by rapid change, uncertainty, and limited resources. Mixing theory and practice, the Young Cultural Leaders will hear lectures on the creation and communication of value, defining what is global and local in today’s interconnected world, and the role of arts organizations in society and communities, as well as participating in skills development workshops focussing on effective communication and team-building, change management and innovation—all draw on the knowledge and experience of and delivered by recognized international experts, from across the world. The intention of the annual forum is to strengthen the leadership capacity both of individuals and of the field as a whole, while at the same time enhancing international understanding and cultural exchange through a vital, new global network of young cultural leaders. Explaining why Salzburg Global Seminar had taken a leading role in developing such a program, Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine explained: “Salzburg Global Seminar was founded in 1947 but right from the start, the idea of youth being a driver and not seeing any reason to say “why not?” was part of the DNA…
 “Even in the early years, the performing arts, the different artistic disciplines were an integral part to the way they approached the values and the debate around how you build a better society so that it would not go back to war again in that century. “When you look back over the 65 years of our programming, we’ve had this continuous connective tissue of programs around the arts, around culture, but also around the social cohesion that goes with bringing people together outside their ordinary productive sectors. What we try to do now, and what is a priority as we go forward, is looking to see what we can learn from the nature of the arts in not only the way we do our culture and arts programming but also what they can tell us in the other areas of our work… “The value of learning through creative practice to collaborate, to listen, to value other voices, to value other perspectives that may seem very strange in the beginning—that set of skills is absolutely critical to global problem-solving and the mission of the Seminar is bound up with challenging creative thinking around the global problems of today and tomorrow.”
The program runs from Saturday, October 26 until Thursday, November 1. A full list of faculty is available here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/498. To follow the discussions taking place at the seminar, please check out our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list: https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498  and for more information visit the YCI webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org/
READ MORE...
Displaying results ###SPAN_BEGIN###%s to %s out of ###SPAN_BEGIN###%s