YCI » Overview

 

Young innovators in the culture and arts sector are providing some of the most imaginative new impulses for social improvement and sustainable development around the world today. They change the way we see and interact with each other. Young artists, creative entrepreneurs and  cultural leaders demonstrate  the  creative  vision,  talent, and  energy  that  our  societies  so  desperately  need  to  meet  the challenges of the 21st century.

The Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators (YCI) is a ten-year project launched by Salzburg Global Seminar in 2014 to engage fifty of the world's most dynamic young creative changemakers every year.

The young cultural innovators join the annual Forum in Salzburg from “YCI hubs” in six regions of the world to help them develop the dynamic vision, entrepreneurial skills, and global networks needed to advance their organizations, their causes and their communities. The YCI Forum represents a major commitment by Salzburg Global Seminar to fostering creative innovation and entrepreneurship worldwide with the intention of building a more vibrant and resilient arts sector and of advancing sustainable economic development, positive social change agendas, and urban transformation worldwide. 

Upcoming Session in 2017:

Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators IV
October 14 to 19, 2017

Peter Jenkinson and Shelagh Wright
in conversation about the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Innovators


 

 


Francisco Gómez Durán: “It’s important to promote cultural industries”
Francisco Gómez Durán: “It’s important to promote cultural industries”
Oscar Tollast 
An associate expert at UNESCO has praised Salzburg Global for its strategy session on ‘Promoting the Next Generation of Cultural Entrepreneurs: Planning for Success’. Francisco Gómez Durán, who works in the promotion of cultural and creative industries in developing countries, attended the recent session alongside 27 other leading thinkers. Mr Gómez Durán has developed cultural initiatives and coordinated international cooperation projects with the United Nations Development Programme. He described cultural entrepreneurship as an “essential part and component” in the promotion of cultural and creative industries. “Always keep in mind that cultural and creative industries are drivers of economic development [and] social inclusion. We should be tapping into the available resources.” During the three-day session, participants discussed the qualities of a cultural entrepreneur and the programs needed to support the work of these people and how to empower them. They shared their experiences and thoughts for the benefit of designing a new program evolving from the 2012 Young Cultural Leaders Forum. Whilst differing definitions were aired, participants agreed on a set of qualities cultural entrepreneurs shared regardless of the institution that they worked for. Mr Gómez Durán explained his role and his latest project working for UNESCO’s International Fund for Cultural Diversity. “We support non-governmental organizations and governmental authorities to develop policies, strategies and action plans that develop cultural and creative industries. “We are, for example, developing a lot of mapping studies that are coming up with very interesting and relevant information that was somehow hidden or not available to relevant stakeholders. “We think that it’s important to promote cultural industries and give operators the means to further develop their activities.” Mr Gómez Durán has also worked with the Spanish International Development Cooperation Agency in India, Malaysia and Brazil. He revealed to Salzburg Global some of the challenges the cultural sector faced in developing countries. “I think there is a big need for tools and for mechanisms in order to allow development in developing countries. “There is a lack of information, a lack of data [and] a lack of resources in order to professionalize the sector.” Mr Gómez Durán said cultural organizations needed access to higher education and tailor-made programs to strengthen their capacities. “We need to convey the message why culture is important and why culture is a driver of development and social economic development. We need to work more on that.” Making his first appearance at Salzburg Global Seminar, Mr Gómez Durán was keen to take away ideas to relate to his work at UNESCO. “I think the best thing that I will bring back to Paris is the possibility of meeting all these amazing people, working at different levels, coming from different backgrounds and organizations.” He described the strategy session as “unique” due to the diversity of participants attending and suggested the richness of ideas and opinions will help develop Salzburg Global’s program within the next 10 years. “I think it’s very important what these different actors have to say, what is their vision, their needs and challenges, [and] expectations. “We are here together, exchanging different ideas, experiences, [and] points of view that I think are going to be very relevant in our future work.”
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Young Cultural Leaders return to critique new 10-year program plan
Young Cultural Leaders return to critique new 10-year program plan
Oscar Tollast 
Several participants from the 2012 Young Cultural Leaders Forum have returned to offer their help for a new Salzburg Global program. They were joined by leading thinkers and practitioners for a strategy session entitled, ‘Promoting the Next Generation of Cultural Entrepreneurs: Planning for Success’. In the past three days, participants have engaged in creative idea development and have been sharing experiences and lessons for the benefit of the program design. Salzburg Global Seminar is committed to evolving the Young Cultural Leaders Forum into a global focal point for international exchange and innovation around, creative cultural entrepreneurship. Last year’s Young Cultural Leaders Forum brought together 47 young cultural leaders from 37 countries around the globe for an intensive leadership development program. Participants returning this year from the Forum included: Sebastian Chan, Lilli Geissendorfer, Patricia Garza, Jimena Lara Estrada, Niyati Mehta, Ayeh Naraghi, Leandro Olocco, Deniz Ova, Belisa Rodrigues, Beck Tench and Rüdiger Wassibauer. The Young Cultural Leaders Forum co-chair, Russell Willis Taylor, and faculty member Fielding Grasty were also in attendance. At the beginning of the session, Clare Shine, Vice President and Chief Program Officer at Salzburg Global Seminar, said creative thinking was organic to the work carried out by program staff. “We really believe and have had many years of programming around the transformative potential of the arts to improve livelihoods and quality of life, to revitalize the way we educate and to leverage completely undreamt of business opportunities into the future decades. “Entrepreneurs with this kind of skillset are an absolute force to be reckoned with and they will help politicians in their countries and mainstream businesses, just as much as they help civil society and community groups.” During this year’s strategy session, participants have consulted together and acted as a focus group on needs assessment, designing impact, fine-tuning program components, establishing effective networks, and measuring success. Global Views on Cultural Entrepreneurship On Sunday evening, participants were further introduced to the topic of cultural entrepreneurship with alternative global perspectives. Clare Shine moderated a fireside discussion on Global Views on Cultural Entrepreneurship, featuring contributions from Lyne Sneige Keyrouz, Belisa Rodrigues, Felipe Buitrago, and Lidia Varbanova. Ms Sneige Keyrouz, a freelancer and consultant on Cultural Affairs in the Middle East, discussed how a greater use of technology had led to more innovative ideas in the Middle East. She said that despite the social upheaval that had taken place in the region, the cultural sector had survived and was now thriving. Mr Buitrago, consultant of the Division of Cultural Affairs, Solidarity and Creativity at the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), said decision-makers at banks had to start paying attention to creative industries and consider what’s next. He suggested the concept that they were beginning to move into a “knowledge economy”. Citing former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, he repeated his adage: “The empires of the future are the empires of the mind.” He suggested a lack of opportunities were being given to those in the creative industries, and that infrastructure needed to have better access and communication. Ms Rodrigues, General Manager of the African Arts Institute based in Cape Town, provided a working context of the creative industry in Africa and relevant success stories. She also discussed her role managing the day-to-day operations of the Arterial Network, a network she described as spending 80 per cent of energy helping to build. The Arterial Network is a pan-African association of artists, cultural activists, creative entrepreneurs and cultural policy experts represented in 40 African countries. The body’s aims include empowering civil society arts and cultural organizations in African countries and regions, developing effective and sustainable networks, and improving the working and living conditions of artists. Ms Varbanova’s presentation focused on Central and Eastern Europe. With over 20 years of professional experience, and a portfolio focused on strategy, entrepreneurship and organizational development, she suggested the region needed to rebrand itself through cultural entrepreneurship. However, she went on to describe how the region – made up of 29 countries – was very broad and each country had its own issues to resolve with regards to the cultural sector. These included a lack of mechanisms to support this sector through public policy and a lack of funding. Speaking about cultural entrepreneurship in more detail, she encouraged artists to rid their fears of balance sheets and understand the business aspect of their careers. Action plan Participants spent much of Monday and Tuesday working within small groups. Discussions ranged from the strengths and weaknesses of the Young Cultural Leaders Forum to the greatest needs in the sector and what future participants should be exposed to. Questions were raised as to how public policy could better support the cultural sector, and what entailed being a cultural entrepreneur. The session came to an end on Tuesday afternoon after participants finalized a project plan, reviewed the main ideas generated during the planning meeting and mapped out the next steps for translating the project plan into action. Susanna Seidl-Fox, Salzburg Global Seminar’s Program Director for Culture and the Arts, described the session as a useful exercise with a lot of notes to take away from. "Having a cohort come from last year and having the prospect of a multi-year project going forward, I can really see a different and more powerful dynamic coming out of that which I just find really exciting. "I hope we can harness all of the good energy [and] the good ideas that have come along." Benjamin Glahn, European Development Director at Salzburg Global Seminar, said he was excited by the participants' contributions and ideas to follow up. "We look forward to going back, looking at the program design, incorporating the ideas and concepts - and some of the cautions too - that you all had for us. "It is a unique privilege to be able to convene a group like this together: the richness of experience and perspective of ideas that have come out are extraordinary."
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The Role of Arts Organizations in Society and their Place in Communities
The Role of Arts Organizations in Society and their Place in Communities
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 
The final panel presentation of of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders focussed on the topic of 'The Role of Arts Organizations in Society and their Place in Communities'. Sharing their experiences with their younger Fellows were co-chair Mulenga Kapwepwe, chair of the National Arts Council in Zambia, Tisa Ho, executive director of the Hong Kong Arts Festival and Eduardo Vilaro, artisitc director at Ballet Hispanico in the USA. Speaking to seminar partner, National Arts Strategies' Dallas Shelby, Ho, Vilaro and Kapwepwe gave their opinions on the key questions with our Young Cultural Leaders, as ever, responding. What is the place of cultural institutions within their communities? Kar Kuan Ng, Executive Director of the Hong Kong Arts Festival suggests that to be truly relevant an organization must be "in, of, for and about" its community. What is the role of arts organizations in society? Eduardo Vilaro, Artistic Director of Ballet Hispanico stresses the importance of art as a connector and being true to your mission. What is the role of an arts and culture leader in today's society? Mulenga Kapwepwe, Chairperson of the National Arts Council of Zambia and co-chair of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders, suggests that arts leaders are best equipped to shape the future. How can cultural organizations work with their communities rather than for their communities? Kapwepwe discusses how widening your definitions can broaden your understanding of community. The Role of Arts Organizations in Society: Discussion Points Fellows of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders talk about the day's discussion around the role of arts organizations in society and their place in the community.  
You can see more videos on the National Arts Strategies channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtsStrategies/, The YCI Webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org and you can follow all the discussions in real time on our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list: https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498
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'Glocal' - What is Global and What is Local in Today's World?
'Glocal' - What is Global and What is Local in Today's World?
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 
The second full of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders focussed on the topic of 'Glocal - what is global and what is local in today's world?'. Sharing their experiences with their younger Fellows were Serhan Ada, Head of the Cultural Management Program at Istanbul Bilgi University, Mikel Ellcessor, General Manager of public radio station WDET in Detroit, and Yudhishthir Raj Isar, Professor of Cultural Policy Studies at the American University of Paris and Eminent Research Visitor at the Institute for Culture and Society, University of Western Sydney. Speaking to seminar partner, National Arts Strategies' Dallas Shelby, Isar, Ellcessor and Ada gave their opinions on the key questions with our Young Cultural Leaders responding. How do arts and culture institutions deal with issues of cultural identity? Yudhishthir Raj Isar, professor of Cultural Policy Studies at The American University of Paris talks about the responsibility that arts and culture organizations have to provide cultural translation. How do cultural institutions balance being global and local? Mikel Ellcessor, General Manager of WDET in Detroit, warns that social media can give us a false sense of connection. He also gives a suggestion for how to make meaningful connections in one's community. How have the forces of globalization impacted the nature of cultural activity? Serhan Ada, Head of the Cultural Management Program at Istanbul Bilgi University, suggest that the "new normal" favors the creative. Fellows of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders talk about the day's discussion around the effects of globalization on culture.

You can see more videos on the National Arts Strategies channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtsStrategies/, the YCI webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org/ and you can follow all the discussions in real time on our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list: https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498
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How Do You Communicate the Value of Arts and Culture?
How Do You Communicate the Value of Arts and Culture?
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 

Sunday, October 27 saw the opening plenary discussions of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders. Tackling the topic of 'The Creation and the Communication of Value' were Gary Vikan, Director of the Walters Museum of Art, Deirdre Prins-Solani, an independent heritage and cultural expert in South Africa, and Patrick McIntyre, Executive Director of the Sydney Theatre Company. Below, they share their opinions on the key questions, with our Young Cultural Leaders giving their response. What can science tell us about the art experience? Gary Vikan, Director of the Walters Museum of Art on how neuroscience, evolutionary biology and the cave paintings in Lascaux might point to the fact that aesthetics is "hard-wired into our heads." How do we communicate the instrumental and intrinsic values of the arts? Vikan talks about the dangers of using economic impact as argument for the arts, the importance of articulating the intrinsic nature of the art experience and how neuroscience might unlock the mystery of that experience. What value does the arts create and how do we articulate it? Deirdre Prins-Solani, an independent heritage and cultural expert in South Africa talks about the interaction between the sacred and public spaces and how that tension creates value. What are the arguments for the arts that resonate with contemporary society? Patrick McIntyre, Executive Director of the Sydney Theatre Company on the need to talk about the arts in terms of its benefits rather than its features. What our Fellows think: The Creation and Communication of Value: Discussion Points
You can see more videos on the National Arts Strategies channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/ArtsStrategies/, the YCI webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org/ and you can follow all the discussions in real time on our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list:  https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498
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You are the future!
You are the future!
Salzburg Global Seminar Staff 
tanding at the front of Parker Hall and addressing 50 25-35 year olds, the president and CEO of National Arts Strategies, Russell Willis Taylor declared: “We are looking at our future. You are the future of our field!” These 50 people from 37 countries and six continents have been gathered as the inaugural in-take of the Salzburg Global Forum for Young Cultural Leaders, running from October 26 to November 1. The program has been designed in partnership between the Salzburg Global Seminar and US-based National Arts Strategies to identify and strengthen young leaders in the arts and culture sectors across the globe. Chosen from an vast field of applicants, the successful participants come a wide variety of backgrounds in the arts – from dance, music, and theater to visual media, museums, and festivals – and already have at least three years of professional experience in the cultural sector. To be selected they had to have a demonstrated interest in strengthening the position of the arts and arts institutions within societies and of having a positive impact on society, as well as showing creativity in their approach to work and openness to innovation. Through the program, co-chaired by Taylor and Mulenga Kapwepwe, chair of the National Arts Council of Zambia, these young practitioners will improve their leadership skills to enable them and their organizations to thrive in a field characterized by rapid change, uncertainty, and limited resources. Mixing theory and practice, the Young Cultural Leaders will hear lectures on the creation and communication of value, defining what is global and local in today’s interconnected world, and the role of arts organizations in society and communities, as well as participating in skills development workshops focussing on effective communication and team-building, change management and innovation—all draw on the knowledge and experience of and delivered by recognized international experts, from across the world. The intention of the annual forum is to strengthen the leadership capacity both of individuals and of the field as a whole, while at the same time enhancing international understanding and cultural exchange through a vital, new global network of young cultural leaders. Explaining why Salzburg Global Seminar had taken a leading role in developing such a program, Vice President and Chief Program Officer Clare Shine explained: “Salzburg Global Seminar was founded in 1947 but right from the start, the idea of youth being a driver and not seeing any reason to say “why not?” was part of the DNA…
 “Even in the early years, the performing arts, the different artistic disciplines were an integral part to the way they approached the values and the debate around how you build a better society so that it would not go back to war again in that century. “When you look back over the 65 years of our programming, we’ve had this continuous connective tissue of programs around the arts, around culture, but also around the social cohesion that goes with bringing people together outside their ordinary productive sectors. What we try to do now, and what is a priority as we go forward, is looking to see what we can learn from the nature of the arts in not only the way we do our culture and arts programming but also what they can tell us in the other areas of our work… “The value of learning through creative practice to collaborate, to listen, to value other voices, to value other perspectives that may seem very strange in the beginning—that set of skills is absolutely critical to global problem-solving and the mission of the Seminar is bound up with challenging creative thinking around the global problems of today and tomorrow.”
The program runs from Saturday, October 26 until Thursday, November 1. A full list of faculty is available here: www.salzburgglobal.org/go/498. To follow the discussions taking place at the seminar, please check out our Twitter hashtag #SGSycl and Twitter list: https://twitter.com/salzburgglobal/sgs-498  and for more information visit the YCI webpage: http://yci.salzburgglobal.org/
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